Patricia Urquiola. Nature Morte Vivante
From 30.01.20 a 01.03.20
10:00 a 21:00

The first exhibition devoted to Partricia Urquiola in Madrid mainly focuses on her work as a designer, showing her works for industrial production, occasionally for craft production and frequently for the cross between them both. The exhibition is laid out in a non-chronological way, gathering the pieces around six still life paintings that explore a series of recurrent themes in her line of work and mindset. These six still life paintings are inspired by Dalí’s painting Nature Morte Vivante, where the objects are depicted in motion, breathing life into them. The exhibition revolves around the following pillars: "Transparent things" brings together a collection of objects that have been important throughout his career, a connection between the past and the future; the so-called “Empathic Journeys” between concepts and projects; the concept of “Resistances”, projects where there is some kind of tension; matters related to gender and all its declensions, a theme called “Gender? What Gender?”; and the positive pollination in the creative process reflected in the “Contaminations” part.

The exhibition shows products from the different stages in Urquiola’s career. She founded her own studio in 2001 and designed furniture, carpets, lamps, tableware, vases, fabrics, bathtubs, pottery and tiles, etc. The items reveal her way of tackling different materials and techniques, with inventiveness, creativity and a fresh approach that helps her break away from the traditional standards and often helps her find new answers to old problems. Her interest in color is the ongoing theme of the exhibition and is expressed through moments of rigor or exuberance, while the concern for sustainability is observed in the recurrent use of “Upcycling”, by means of pieces in which recycled materials are reused to produce new objects.

 


Dates: January 30 - March 1
Opening hours: Tuesday to Sunday from 10 am a 9pm
Place: Fernán Gómez. Centro Cultural de la Villa
Curator: Ana Domínguez Siemens
Admission: Free